Featured Car Donation of the Week: 1976 MG B Roadster for Michigan Public Radio/NPR

October 19, 2015
Author: S.A. Stevenson

This week we’re featuring two vintage charity car donations: a 1964 Ford Thunderbird for Last Chance for Animals, and as you can see above: the 1976 MG B Roadster for Michigan Public Radio & NPR. We’re currently auctioning this featured car donation on eBay.

As you can see, this is a real beauty! This vehicle’s sleek white exterior and black, vinyl interior is just great to admire, especially if you have a thing for classic Roadsters. This vehicle boasts over $6,000 of restoration and maintenance performed upon it over the past two years, so you know that not only does it look great, but it runs good too!

These vehicles peaked in production right around 1975-1976 with over 35,000 units sold during the time-frame and were just a hoot to drive. This vehicle was one of the first MG models to feature the new US Federal 5 MPH Crash Bumpers. These well-recognized, black-rubber bumpers were needed to comply with American crash-testing standards for its era. The 1976 installment of the MGB sported a rear anti-sway bar that was added to significantly improve this vehicle’s handling over the 1975 model, which was the first model to introduce the 5 MPH Crash Bumpers.

As always, we love it when an individual donates a car to charity, and this is no exception…this convertible is great eye-candy!

About Michigan Public Radio

When you donate a vehicle to Michigan Radio, you can actually turn your car into the programs and news you rely on and love. Your gift makes a difference at Michigan Radio! In addition to supporting your favorite public radio shows, we’ll tow your vehicle for free, and your donation is tax deductible.

Donating a car is fast, easy and secure. Michigan Radio accepts any vehicle – running or not -including cars, trucks, boats, RVs, and motorcycles. We work with our public radio colleagues at Car Talk Vehicle Donation Services to ensure that your donation delivers the highest possible return and that your experience is simple and convenient.

If you have any questions about the vehicle donation process, please don’t hesitate to reach out to our vehicle donation experts at 855-277-2346. Or begin your car donation by visiting our online vehicle donation form.

Do you have a question about how to donate a car to charities? Check out our FAQ section and we’ll help you out! Interested in what other charities we service? Check out our charities page to get started!

Featured Car Donation: 1976 MG B Roadster

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Featured Car Donation of the Week: 1964 Ford Thunderbird for Last Chance for Animals

October 19, 2015
Author: S.A. Stevenson

This week we’re featuring two vintage charity car donations: a 1976 MG B Roadster that was donated for Michigan Public Radio & NPR, and as you can see above: the 1964 Ford Thunderbird for Last Chance for Animals. We’re currently auctioning this featured car donation on eBay.

This black, classic convertible is a slice of pure Americana, and a great vehicle for any collector! This initial installment of the fourth generation of the Ford Thunderbirds (also known as the “Jet Birds”) was a market segment leader for Ford as it led to a 50% annual increase in sales.

The 1964 Ford Thunderbird is a culmination of Ford’s effort to couple sporty intentions with luxury as the 1964 iteration of the Thunderbird received a restyling that gave it a squared-off, formal look. Though this vehicle’s 8-cyclinder, standard engine takes about 11 seconds to push this vehicle to 60mph, it does have a potential top speed of 120 mph!

According to its VIN (Vehicle Identification Number), this particular Ford is a 1964 convertible that came off the line in Wixom, Michigan. It’s got a 390 cubic inch, 4V, V-8 engine and was the 139,991st car ordered for production. Today, this ’64 Thunderbird became part of the car donation wizard program and is slated to help save the lives of mistreated and abused animals around the world.

About the Last Chance For Animals
Founded in 1984 by Hollywood actor Chris DeRose, Last Chance For Animals (LCA) has its roots in fighting and exposing the inherent cruelty of vivisection. In the organization’s early years, DeRose led teams of dedicated activists employing non-violent strategies modeled after social movements led by such leaders as Mahatma Gandhi and Martin Luther King, Jr.

With its national reputation growing, LCA received support from around the country, and around the world — from caring people who decided that it was time to fight peacefully yet fight hard… staging direct action, and gathering evidence to send animal abusers to jail.

With an increased budget and staff, LCA expanded its focus beyond vivisection. In the 1980s, 1990s, 2000s, and 2010s, LCA has worked on virtually every animal rights issue, including farming, fur, and animals in entertainment. LCA’s primary focuses are vivisection, pet theft, fur, and circuses.

If you have any questions about the vehicle donation process, please don’t hesitate to reach out to our charity car donation experts at 877-999-8322. Or begin your car donation by visiting our online vehicle donation form.

Do you have a question about how to donate a car to charities? Check out our FAQ section and we’ll help you out! Interested in what other charities we service? Check out our charities page to get started!

Featured Car Donation: 1964 Ford Thunderbird

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Many car-donation organizations leave little to charity

Some firms keep 50% to 90% of the proceeds from a vehicle’s sale, a watchdog group says.

Liz Pulliam Weston | Money Talk

Dear Liz: I want to dispose of my older car but don’t want to face the hassle and intrusion of selling it. I’m having trouble finding a reputable car donation organization in my area. I checked with a charity watchdog site but it didn’t have information on specific charities to use. Can you recommend an organization that operates efficiently and actually gives a substantial amount of the car proceeds to charity?

Answer: Start paying attention to which charities heavily advertise their car donation programs on commercial radio and TV stations and strongly consider avoiding them.

Many of these ads are paid for by for-profit companies that wind up keeping most of the proceeds from car sales. “Even the most reputable of the agencies that handle these transactions keep nearly 50% of the car’s value for their troubles,” notes watchdog site Charity Navigator, adding that other, less scrupulous entities keep 90%, or even more.

By contrast, charities that handle the donations themselves get to keep all or at least most of the proceeds. But finding such charities may not be easy.

Instead of starting with an ad, start with a charity you admire. Call and ask if it accepts car donations, or check its website. If the charity accepts such donations, ask if it handles the donation itself or contracts out to another entity. If it contracts, ask how much of the proceeds are donated to the charity. If you can live with that percentage, go ahead with the donation.

If you’re really stumped, check out your local public radio or television station. Many accept vehicle donations, and although the sales may be contracted out, the nonprofit typically ends up with the bulk of the proceeds.

Finally, remember that your tax deduction, if any, typically will be limited to what the car sells for at auction. And you won’t get any tax break if you don’t itemize your deductions on the relevant year’s tax return.

For the full article click here.

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