Car Donation Wizard: Connecting Donors to Charities

June 25, 2015
Guest Blogger: Amanda Nevitt

At Car Donation Wizard we bring donors and charities together. Every year we receive thousands of car donations from individuals who want to help their favorite cause. We are experts at helping donors make a big impact by turning their donated cars into cash.

In addition to individual cars, trucks and motorcycles, we receive a fair share of “fleet” vehicles, which is a group of motor vehicles owned by a business rather than an individual. We’ve received shuttle vans for hotels, to big box trucks from corporations. They are an important part of our business and make a big difference for the benefiting charity.

Companies on average keep their fleet vehicles for about five years; most are at the end of their life and not worth much on trade in. What’s a sensible way to extend the life of those vehicles? Donate them! Not only does the donating company receive a tax deduction, but it’s a great way to help build houses, find cures for diseases, protect animals, empower veterans, keep children healthy & safe…(insert your favorite cause here).

Are you ready to donate? Let us help you get the most money for your charity of choice. Click here to get started.

You might also be interested in:
How to Find a Charity That Accepts Vehicle Donations
Car Donation: Your Questions Answered
Making Vehicle Donation Easy
Car Donation Scams: How to Avoid Them

About ARS
Advanced Remarketing Services offers innovative solutions to some of the remarketing industry’s toughest questions. We navigate the confusing landscape of wholesale, salvage and consumer markets to sell the vehicles in the best venue to the most appropriate buyer base.

Media Contact
Lisa Crowell, News Desk
1.877.709.2277 x 3127

Car Donation Driven by Hope

There are 14.4 million cancer survivors in the United States1. That’s a BIG number!! But, some may ask, “How many people died of cancer?” Well, as one vehicle donor recently told me, “you can focus on the gloom, or the hope” and we’re focusing on the HOPE. After all, it’s why we’re in the business – taking vehicle donations for charities that work to make life better, healthier, fuller.

Recently, I was fortunate enough to speak with Beverly (Bella) Harris, one of the 14 million U.S. survivors. And, although I haven’t met all survivors, I can say she is the epitome of Hope. Bella bravely witnessed many loved ones battle cancer, some winning their fight while others did not. She also successfully endured her own battle and was left with more courage and Hope than she ever thought possible.

Once a bottom-line business woman, she was laid-off from her corporate job during her treatment. It was then she realized her dream of becoming an educator to special need students and discovered she now had the time to obtain that degree and certification. Today, Bella is completely dedicating her life to serving children with special needs and the families that love them.

Bella attributes her new life to her difficult health journey. She sees her struggle as a forced pause where instead of being scared she would lose life; she enveloped herself in the possibilities ahead of her and everything she could do when she was healed. She was granted that chance to continue and is now working harder than ever, but enjoying it more than she imagined. Because of her struggle, she is able to help her students and their families realize and attain what they might have seen as impossible. Bella is driven by Hope, and transfers to her students the Hope of development, empowerment, independence, and success. A gift she could not so fully share had it not been for her personal struggle.

Yes, she is fully aware that nothing about tomorrow is guaranteed, but instead of squandering today in fear, she does the most she can today. Our conversation put into perspective my own fears and worries…and how I am spending my time. It made me realize how paralyzing fear is…and that Hope is the perfectly fit prosthetic. Hope it what keeps us donating to support the search for cures, ways to heal, and comfort.

Throughout our conversation, Bella continued to comment on the beauty of life around her, and her gratitude for the chance to move forward and share her gifts. She pulled me into her world where I could feel her arsenal of Hope that includes strength, energy, power, and warmth.

Recently, as part of her arsenal of Hope, Bella donated her car to the American Cancer Society which was turned into valuable funding for cancer research, resources, and education. And, just like Bella, it WILL make a difference!

If you would like to make a difference by donating your vehicle, start by clicking here.

About the American Cancer Society
The American Cancer Society is the nationwide, community-based, voluntary health organization dedicated to eliminating cancer as a major health problem by preventing cancer, saving lives, and diminishing suffering from cancer, through research, education, advocacy, and service.

Media Contact
Lisa Crowell, News Desk
1.877.709.2277 x3127sunshine

Giving Back for Mother’s Day

Car Donation Wizard wishes you a Happy Mother’s Day!

car donation mother's day

Looking for a way to give back this Mother’s Day? Check out UNICEF’s inspired gifts page, whose proceeds go to save children worldwide.

Mother’s Day Inspired Gifts

In the parched Sahel region of West and Central Africa, children are becoming truly desperate – desperate to find any scrap of food, desperate for hope, desperate to keep the last spark of life alive. For malnourished children like these, the Child Survival Food Pack is the ultimate care package. With a simple box containing therapeutic food, high-energy biscuits, and more, you can breathe life into a child dying of starvation.

Help save a life this Mother’s Day. It’s a truly heartwarming gift.

The U.S. Fund for UNICEF also accepts vehicle donations. Do you have an old car, boat on a trailer, truck, RV, motorcycle or other vehicle? Consider donating it to the U.S. Fund for UNICEF today. Visit our vehicle donation to the U.S. Fund for UNICEF page today for more information.

UNICEF News: 12,000 fewer children perish daily in 2010 than in 1990

Caryl M. Stern, President and CEO of the U.S. Fund for UNICEF announced that today marks a huge milestone for UNICEF, and it couldn’t have happened without the support of generous donors everywhere.

UNICEF just announced that the child mortality rate has dropped substantially. That means a child has a better chance of surviving to the age of 5 than just one year ago.

Take a look at the press release below for the details. As you read it, know that this hard-fought progress happened because of your support of UNICEF.

12,000 fewer children perish daily in 2010 than in 1990

NEW YORK/GENEVA, 15 September 2011 – The number of children under five years of age dying each year declined from more than 12 million in 1990 to 7.6 million in 2010, UNICEF and the World Health Organization said today, releasing the latest estimates on worldwide child mortality.

These new figures show that compared to 1990, around 12,000 more children’s lives are saved each day.

An annual report on child mortality found that in sub-Saharan Africa, the region with the highest number of under-five deaths in the world, the speed at which the under-five mortality rate is declining doubled from 1.2 per cent a year during 1990-2000 to 2.4 per cent a year during 2000-2010.

“The news that the rate of child mortality in Sub-Saharan Africa is declining twice as fast as it was a decade ago shows that we can make progress even in the poorest places, but we cannot for a moment forget the chilling fact of around 21,000 children dying every day from preventable causes,” said Anthony Lake, UNICEF Executive Director. “Focusing greater investment on the most disadvantaged communities will help us save more children’s lives, more quickly and more cost effectively.”

Between 1990 and 2010, the under-five mortality rate dropped by more than one-third, from 88 deaths per 1,000 live births to 57.

Unfortunately, this rate of progress is still insufficient to meet Millennium Development Goal 4 (MDG4), which calls for a two-thirds reduction in the under-five mortality rate by 2015.

“Reductions in child mortality are linked to many factors, particularly increased access to health care services around the newborn period. As well as prevention and treatment of childhood illnesses, and improved nutrition, immunization coverage, and water and sanitation,” said Dr Margaret Chan, WHO Director General. “This is proof that investing in children’s health is money well spent, and a sign that we need to accelerate that investment through the coming years.”

Some of the greatest improvements are in countries where children are most vulnerable.

One example is Niger, where the 1990 under-five mortality rate was 311 per 1,000 live births. To address the often large distances between people and health centres, a strategy of deploying trained community health workers to deliver high-impact interventions at thousands of new health posts across the country was used. In 2010, Niger was one of the five countries with the greatest absolute reductions in overall under-five mortality rates, together with Malawi, Liberia, Timor-Leste and Sierra Leone.

Dr. Chan and Mr. Lake agreed that the commitment of governments and the implementation of strategies to overcome local constraints to access and use of essential services are critical success factors.

The report shows that newborns and infants are the most at risk of dying, and there has been less progress for them than within the under-five age category as a whole. More than 40 per cent of under-five deaths occur within the first month of life and over 70 per cent in the first year of life.

The improvements and progress are encouraging – but stark disparities persist. Sub-Saharan Africa is still home to the highest rates of child mortality, with one in eight children dying before reaching five – more than 17 times the average for developed regions (1 in 143). Southern Asia has the second highest rates with 1 in 15 children dying before age five.

Under-five deaths are increasingly concentrated in sub-Saharan Africa and Southern Asia. In 1990, 69 per cent of under-five deaths occurred in these two regions – in 2010, that proportion increased to 82 per cent. About half of all under five deaths in the world took place in just five countries in 2010: India, Nigeria, Democratic Republic of Congo, Pakistan and China.

The new estimates are published in the 2011 report Levels & Trends in Child Mortality, issued by the UN Inter-agency Group for Child Mortality Estimation (IGME), which is led by UNICEF and WHO and includes the World Bank and the UN Population Division.


UNICEF has saved more children’s lives than any other humanitarian aid organization in the world. Working in more than 150 countries, UNICEF provides children with health care, clean water, nutrition, education, emergency relief, and more. The U.S. Fund for UNICEF supports UNICEF’s work through fundraising, advocacy, and education in the United States.

UNICEF is at the forefront of efforts to reduce child mortality worldwide. There has been substantial progress: the annual number of under-five deaths dropped from nearly 13 million in 1990 to 7.6 million in 2010. But still, 21,000 children die each day from preventable causes. Our mission is to do whatever it takes to make that number zero by giving children the essentials for a safe and healthy childhood.

About WHO
WHO is the directing and coordinating authority for health within the United Nations system. It is responsible for providing leadership on global health matters, shaping the health research agenda, setting norms and standards, articulating evidence-based policy options, providing technical support to countries and monitoring and assessing health trends.

About the IGME
IGME was formed in 2004 to share data on child mortality, harmonize estimates within the UN system, improve methods for child mortality estimation report on progress towards the Millennium Development Goals and enhance country capacity to produce timely and properly assessed estimates of child mortality. The IGME, led by the United Nations Children’s Fund and the World Health Organization, also includes the World Bank and the United Nations Population Division of the Department of Economic and Social Affairs as full members.

The 2011 child mortality report contains the latest IGME estimates of child mortality at the country, regional and global levels. For more information on child mortality estimates visit